Natural Nature Learning

by Deborah Taylor-Hough

Our family hasn’t been blessed with acres of property off in the country for our children to frolic to their hearts content. But a small city lot and many local parks have offered us tremendous opportunities for outdoor learning activities.

PARKS

To make up for the lack of open natural space in our neighborhood, we go to various local parks at least two to three times per week. We don’t go to the parks for the play equipment but for the exposure to a more natural setting. We are about half-an-hour driving time from Puget Sound so we often frequent parks with direct beach access. Continue reading

200+ Summertime Boredom Busters for Kids

by Deborah Taylor-Hough

Since we try not to use the phrase “I’m bored!” in our home, I usually don’t hear my kids complaining about being bored during those long days at home during the summer months.But I have to admit that we’re still an incredibly normal family. Even without the “b-word” in their vocabulary, there are still those times when my three children just seem to be at a total loss for something constructive to do. Continue reading

Who’s Afraid of the Big, Bad Bard?

by Debi Taylor-Hough

A number of years ago (I think it was more than ten), we added Shakespeare to our family’s educational activities for the first time. My daughter loved our field trip to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland, and I don’t think I ever would have thought of introducing my children to The Bard at such a young age if it weren’t for the inspiration of Charlotte Mason, a British educator from the late 1800’s.

First, we read through Charles and Mary Lamb’s story version of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” in the book Tales from Shakespeare just to enjoy the plot and make sure we understood the basic story line before attempting to wade through the Elizabethan English of the play itself. Continue reading

Taking Your Homeschool Outside

by Geoffrey Moore

Like anything else in your life, your homeschool can be in a rut. You wake up every morning, crack the same books and do the same lesson plans. After a few months of this, both you and your kids are yawning and dreading sledging through the drudgery.

The good news is that you have the power to change this! You don’t have to do school-at-home. Do you have an outdoor fire pit or other fun area you can gather? Put down the plan book and break away from the textbook rut.

Here are a few tips to get you started. Continue reading

Homeschool Planning – Don’t Wait Until August to Begin !

by Angie McFarren

Who wants to think about school during the summer? The most common answer is no one. Homeschooling families are no different from their counterparts. After all, the whole point of a summer break is fun and relaxation.

Before we get into the purpose of this article, let us review this past school year. Did you feel overwhelmed and frustrated Continue reading

Learning Impulse Control

by Pam Golden

Imagine you’re a typical four-year old. Someone puts a fluffy white marshmallow down in front of you and says, “I have to run some errands. If you can wait a few minutes until I get back, you can have two marshmallows as a special treat. If you can’t wait, you can only have one, but you can have it right now,” and then leaves. What would you do?

Dr. Walter Mischel at Stanford University tried this with a group of preschoolers. Many of the kids gobbled up the marshmallow almost before the researcher disappeared through the door. Continue reading

Nature Study for City Dwellers

by Catherine Levison

Even in the city, children should get their knowledge of nature first hand and get into the habit of being in touch with nature.  Here are some simple nature and science ideas for city (and rural) families to share together:

1) Press and mount flowers on cardboard. Write the names of the flowers, and where and when you found them. I recently saw a photo-album used to store pressed flowers. Having a field guide to identify flowers and flowering trees is very helpful. Continue reading

Frugal Easter Basket Ideas

j0401449.jpgIf you look forward to giving Easter baskets to your children each year but don’t enjoy the high price of expensive pre-made baskets, here are some simple ideas for saving money on this fun holiday tradition. Like anything else you buy, it helps to set a spending limit — maybe $5 or $10 per Easter basket. Then have fun being creative and trying to keep within your basket budget.

Our family usually reserves Easter baskets and Easter Egg Hunts for the Saturday just before Easter — saving Sunday for church and family celebrations.

I try to shop for Easter basket fillers in advance (I use the same principle for Christmas stocking stuffers, too). You can keep a basket in the corner of a closet for storing these types of items found throughout the year. Keep an eye out for small games and toys in clearance bins at the grocery store, at dollar stores, and during any stops to thrift stores or yard sales.

In the days immediately following Halloween, bags of candy often go on sale for half price (or less), so I’ll sometimes purchase several bags of family favorites and stick them in the freezer. Frozen candy will keep quite nicely until Easter.

Small, fun items that you’ll probably need to purchase for your children during the course of the year can be saved to include in their Easter baskets: crayons, felt pens, glue stick, glitter glue, novelty toothbrushes, fun-flavored toothpastes, hair ribbons, barrettes, a new hair brush, bubble bath in fun containers.

Ideas for the Basket Itself:

  • Wicker baskets can be reused year after year (a nice tradition in itself). These can be used other times during the year for decoration or for storing small items. You can also reuse the decorative grass from year to year.
  • Paper bags decorated with bunnies, eggs, flowers, etc.
  • Easter bonnets. If you’re going to be purchasing an Easter bonnet for your daughter, turn it upside down and fill with goodies.
  • Inexpensive colorful plastic sand pails. Include a shovel and sand mold.
  • Plastic mesh storage containers. Reuse to store toys, games, socks, childhood treasures, etc.
    Lunch box.
  • New novelty pillowcase.
  • Flower pot (fill w/packet of seeds, soil, drainage rocks, gardening gloves, instructions for growing their own Spring flowers).
  • For older kids/teens, try a make-up container (including sample sizes of soap, perfume, lipgloss, nail polish, etc.), a fishing tackle box (include a few lures), a personal popcorn bowl (containing a bag of gourmet popcorn), or a new purse.
  • For teen-agers or grown children, try a grocery bag filled with their favorite foods.

Filling ideas:

  • Plastic eggs can be reused every year. Fill with jelly beans or small plastic toys of interest to the child. Bags full of fake bugs, dinosaurs, etc., can often be found at dollar stores for under a $1 per bag.
  • Homemade candy and treats.
  • Homemade frosted Easter-shaped cookies individually wrapped. You can also make cookie lollipops by adding a lollipop or ice cream stick before baking.
  • Crispy Rice Treats or Popcorn Balls colored with pastel food coloring and shaped like eggs.
  • Sidewalk Chalk Eggs: Mix 1 cup plaster, 1/2 cup water and several drops food coloring. Pour mixture into empty egg carton sections. When dry, peel away the carton and hot glue two sections together at the center to form a complete egg.
  • Toys from fast food children’s meals can be found in “like new” condition at thrift stores and yard sales for $0.25 or less.
  • Rubber stamps and stamp pads.
  • Homemade play dough.
  • Crayons.
  • Small bag of potato chips.
  • Bubbles.
  • A jumprope.
  • Jacks.
  • A frisbee.
  • Chopsticks.
  • Fancy shoelaces.
  • Stickers.
  • Books.
  • Stationary, note cards, envelopes, stamps.
  • Coloring books or coloring sheets. Find some simple Easter related clip-art and print the picture out in black and white for homemade coloring sheets, or print out several and staple them together for a custom made coloring book.
  • Audio tapes you’ve made of yourself reading their favorite books aloud. Be sure to include a signal for them to turn the page if they’ll be reading along with you.
  • Look for small Dover Books at your local bookstore. These books are high quality and usually under $1 each. They have paper dolls, holiday activity books, coloring books, etc.

Happy Spring!

Basics of Inductive Bible Study — now FREE!

I changed the price of the ebook downloadable version of my Basics of Inductive Bible Study book … it’s now FREE! Yep, you read that right. I decided it was a lot more important to me that it got into people’s hands than making a few cents here and there.

Feel free to tell your friends. ♥

Blurb from the website:

Think the Bible’s confusing? You don’t understand the language? Don’t let the Bible intimidate you anymore! Here’s a simple, step-by-step guide to studying the Bible for anyone, both newbie and experienced alike. Learn to see for yourself what the Bible is really saying, what it all means, and then discover how to easily and practically apply its teachings to your own life. Topics covered include: Observation, themes, people, context, key words, interpretation, word studies, application, basic study outline, helpful suggestions for Bible study leaders, and several sample lessons from a study on the epistle (“letter”) to the first-century church at Philippi (aka “Philippians”). Basics of Inductive Bible Study is based on the teaching outline from the author’s class, “An Introduction to Bible Study.”

http://www.lulu.com/product/paperback/basics-of-inductive-bible-study/5420832

The print version is still available, as well, but I I couldn’t lower its price to zero like I could with the ebook.